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The Second Division Clubs






THE PITTSBURGH CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Pittsburgh club opened the April campaign in the ranks of the second
division, the end of the month seeing the team in seventh place, three
other Western teams leading them on April 30th. During May they got into
the first division, and May 21st they were among the three leaders, with
Cleveland and Baltimore first and second in the race. At the end of the
May campaign they had rallied as well, and had pulled up to first place,
with the percentage figures of .710 to Cleveland's .679 and Baltimore's
.654, Boston, Philadelphia and New York being the next three. In June,
the Pittsburghs fell off in the race, and by the 11th of that month they
were down to fifth place, then pulled up again after touching sixth
position, and on June 30th stood fourth, they then being headed by
Baltimore, Boston and Brooklyn, with Philadelphia and New York in their
rear. In July they fell off badly, and on the 20th of that month they
had been driven out of the first division. At the end of the July
campaign they stood sixth in the race. They got a step higher the early
part of August, but the end of that month's campaign saw the club once
more in the ranks of the second division, and they struggled in vain to
get out of the company of the six tail-enders, the end of the race
seeing the club in seventh place with the percentage figures of .500,
Cleveland leading them by 27 points.

The record of the Pittsburgh club for 1894 giving the victories and
defeats scored, with a total of games played and the percentage of
victories against each club; also, the record of the series of games
won, lost, tied or unfinished, together with that of the "Chicago"
victories and defeats, and the single and double figure games scored by
the club, is as follows:

THE PITTSBURGH CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W C L
B l a C S i o
a N a B s l t n u
l e d r h e C . c i
PITTSBURGH t w B e o i v h i s
i o l o n e i L n v
vs. m Y s p k g l c o n i
o o t h l t a a u a l
r r o i y o n g i t l
e k n a n n d o s i e
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 4 4 4 4 5 8 29 8 6 6 7 9 36
Defeats 6 8 8 8 7 4 41 4 6 6 5 3 24
Games played 10 12 12 12 12 12 70 12 12 12 12 12 60
Per cent. of
Victories .400 .333 .333 .333 .417 .667 .414 .667 .500 .500 .500 .583 .600
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W C L
B l a C S i o
a N a B s l t n u
l e d r h e C . c i
PITTSBURGH t w B e o i v h i s
i o l o n e i L n v
vs. m Y s p k g l c o n i
o o t h l t a a u a l
r r o i y o n g i t l
e k n a n n d o s i e Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 3 4
Series lost 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 . 0 0 0 0 0 4
Series tied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 1 1 0 0 2 2
Series unfinished 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 . 0 0 0 0 0 1
"Chicago" victories 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 2
"Chicago" defeats 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 . 0 0 0 0 2 2
Single figure victories 3 1 1 3 2 3 13 5 3 4 3 7 22 35
Single figure defeats 1 7 7 3 3 0 21 3 2 4 2 3 14 35
Double figure victories 1 3 3 1 3 5 16 3 3 2 4 2 14 30
Double figure defeats 5 1 1 5 4 4 20 1 4 2 3 0 10 20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The "Pirates," it will be seen, were very unsuccessful against the
Eastern teams, the Washingtons being the only club they could win a
series from. Against their Western rivals, however, they did not lose a
series, defeating Cleveland, Cincinnati and Louisville, and tieing with
Chicago and St. Louis. The very club they wanted most to defeat they
captured, viz., the Clevelands; that, and the fact that they led the
second division clubs being the only consolation they had.



THE CHICAGO CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

Never before in the history of the Chicago club had any of its teams
ever started a pennant race so badly as did the Chicago "Colts" in
1894. They finished the April campaign with the unenviable record of
eight defeats out of nine games played, they then being a bad tail-ender
in the race, with the poor percentage figures of .111 only. They
remained in the last ditch up to May 10th, by which date they had won
but two games out of thirteen played, the result being costly to the
club in poor gate receipts. The next day they pushed the Washingtons
into the last ditch--their home place for years--and by May 14th had got
up to tenth position. But the end of May saw the "Colts" no higher in
the race record than eleventh place, just on the ragged edge of the last
ditch. By the end of the June campaign they had pulled up a little, they
were standing in tenth place on June 30th; there they remained until the
last day of the July campaign, when they managed to get into ninth
place. During August they rallied for the first time in the race, and by
the end of that month's campaign they stood eighth. But they could not
get higher in the race, and they had to be content with eighth position
at the end of the season, their poor record including that of being the
only club of the twelve which had not, at one time or another, occupied
a place in the ranks of the first division clubs. It was the worst
season's record known in the history of the Chicago club.

Here is the club record:

THE CHICAGO CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C L
B l a C i S i o
a N a B s l t t n u
l e d r h e t . c i
CHICAGO t w B e o i v s i s
i o l o n e b L n v
vs. m Y s p k g l u o n i
o o t h l t a r u a l
r r o i y o n g i t l
e k n a n n d h s i e
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 3 1 5 7 6 7 29 2 6 6 6 8 28
Defeats 9 11 7 5 6 5 43 10 6 6 6 4 32
Games played 12 12 12 12 12 12 60 12 12 12 12 12 60
Per cent. of
Victories .250 .083 .417 .583 .500 .583 .403 .375 .500 .500 .500 .667 .467
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C L
B l a C i S i o
a N a B s l t t n u
l e d r h e t . c i
CHICAGO t w B e o i v s i s
i o l o n e b L n v
vs. m Y s p k g l u o n i
o o t h l t a r u a l
r r o i y o n g i t l
e k n a n n d h s i e Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 3
Series lost 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 4
Series tied 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 .. 1 1 1 0 3 4
Series unfinished 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
"Chicago" victories 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
"Chicago" defeats 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 5
Single figure victories 1 1 1 0 2 1 6 1 2 3 2 6 14 20
Single figure defeats 2 8 2 1 5 4 22 6 3 4 2 3 18 40
Double figure victories 2 1 4 7 4 6 24 1 4 3 4 2 14 38
Double figure defeats 7 3 5 4 1 1 21 4 3 2 4 1 14 35
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Chicago "Colts" won two series against the Eastern teams, viz.,
those with the Washingtons and the Philadelphias, and they had a tie
series with Brooklyn and a close fight with Boston; but the New Yorks
whipped them the worst any club had ever before succeeded in doing in a
season's series, as the "Giants" won eleven out of twelve games; the
Baltimores, too, had an easy task in winning against the
"Colts". Against their Western rivals, however, they lost but one
series, viz., that with Cleveland; but they only won one series--that
with Louisville--they tieing Pittsburgh, St. Louis and Cincinnati.



THE ST. LOUIS CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The St. Louis club opened the April campaign among the leaders, and put
up their stock to a premium, by ending the month's record tied with
Boston and Cleveland for first place, each with a percentage of .750,
the club's special rival--Comiskey's Cincinnati "Reds"--ending the April
campaign tied with Baltimore for fifth place. After this April spurt in
the race, however, the "Browns" began to fall back in their record
during May, and by the 7th of that month were down to sixth position,
and on May 14th they had to give way to Cincinnati, they then falling
back into the second division ranks; and on the 17th of May they were
down to ninth place, and then the best they could do during the last
week of the May campaign was to end eighth in the race on May
31st. During June they tried to get back into the first division, but
they failed to reach higher than seventh position. During July they got
lower down in the ranks of the second division, and they ended that
month's campaign as low as tenth place, and they were kept there until
the very last day of the season, when two victories over the
Washingtons, with a tie game between Cincinnati and Cleveland, enabled
the "Browns" to win the consolation prize, viz., leading Cincinnati at
the finish, by the percentage figures of .424 to .419, the St. Louis
team ending in ninth place and the Cincinnatis in tenth position.

The record of the St. Louis club for 1894 giving the victories and
defeats scored, with the total of games played and the percentage of
victories against each club; also, the record of the series of games
won, lost, tied and unfinished, together with that of the "Chicago"
victories and defeats and the single and double figure victories and
defeats scored by the club, is as follows:

THE ST. LOUIS CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C L
B l a C i i o
a N a B s l t n u
l e d r h e t C c i
ST .LOUIS t w B e o i v s h i s
i o l o n e b i n v
vs. m Y s p k g l u c n i
o o t h l t a r a a l
r r o i y o n g g t l
e k n a n n d h o i e
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 2 5 6 7 4 6 30 3 6 6 5 6 26
Defeats 10 7 6 5 8 6 42 9 6 6 7 6 34
Games played 12 12 12 12 12 12 72 12 12 12 12 12 69
Per cent. of
Victories .167 .417 .500 .583 .333 .500 .417 .250 .500 .500 .417 .500 .433
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C L
B l a C i i o
a N a B s l t n u
l e d r h e t C c i
ST. LOUIS t w B e o i v s h i s
i o l o n e b i n v
vs. m Y s p k g l u c n i
o o t h l t a r a a l
r r o i y o n g g t l
e k n a n n d h o i e Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2
Series lost 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 2 5
Series tied 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 3 5
Series unfinished 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
"Chicago" victories 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
"Chicago" defeats 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 4 5
Single figure victories 0 5 5 3 3 2 18 1 4 4 4 4 17 35
Single figure defeats 7 5 0 2 3 3 20 7 4 3 5 6 25 45
Double figure victories 2 0 1 4 1 4 12 2 2 2 1 2 9 21
Double figure defeats 3 2 6 3 5 3 22 2 2 3 2 0 9 31
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The St. Louis "Browns" did well in winning one of their Eastern
series--that with Philadelphia--and tieing with Boston and
Washington. But the Baltimores gave them a bad whipping, and the
Brooklyns and "Phillies" took them into camp easily. Against their
Western adversaries, however, they failed to win a single series; but
they only lost one--that with Cleveland--as they tied with Pittsburgh,
Chicago and Louisville.



THE CINCINNATI CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Cincinnati club did not begin their opening campaign until April
20th, and during that month's short campaign they occupied third place
on April 24th, and retained their position among the leaders to the end
of the month. In May, however, they fell back into the ranks of the
second division clubs, and remained there until May 16th, when they
occupied sixth place in the first division. By the end of that month,
however, they had been pushed back to ninth position. There they
remained during the whole of the June campaign. During July they
improved their position by getting into eighth position, where they
stood on July 31st. August's campaign did not improve their standing; on
the contrary, they fell back into ninth place, where they stood on
August 31st. During September they were almost anchored in that
position, but on the very last day of the race they let their old
rivals, the "Browns," beat them out, and Comiskey had to finish tenth in
the race, and then he said he'd had enough, and he concluded to "go
West," where he will remain for 1895.

Here is the Cincinnati club's record:

THE CINCINNATI CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P L
B l a C i o
a N a B s l t S u
l e d r h e t C t i
CINCINNATI t w B e o i v s h . s
i o l o n e b i L v
vs. m Y s p k g l u c o i
o o t h l t a r a u l
r r o i y o n g g i l
e k n a n n d h o s e
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 2 5 4 2 6 7 26 3 5 6 7 7 28
Defeats 10 7 8 8 6 5 44 8 7 6 5 5 31
Games played 12 12 12 10 12 12 70 11 12 12 12 12 59
Per cent. of
Victories .167 .417 .338 .200 .500 .583 .371 .273 .417 .500 .583 .588 .475
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P L
B l a C i o
a N a B s l t S u
l e d r h e t C t i
CINCINNATI t w B e o i v s h . s
i o l o n e b i L v
vs. m Y s p k g l u c o i
o o t h l t a r a u l
r r o i y o n g g i l
e k n a n n d h o s e Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 3
Series lost 1 1 1 1 0 1 5 1 1 0 0 0 2 7
Series tied 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Series unfinished 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2
"Chicago" victories 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 3 4
"Chicago" defeats 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 2
Single figure victories 1 5 2 3 3 5 19 2 2 2 5 6 17 36
Single figure defeats 4 4 3 2 1 5 19 4 3 2 4 5 18 37
Double figure victories 1 0 2 1 3 2 9 1 3 4 2 1 11 20
Double figure defeats 6 3 5 6 5 0 25 4 4 4 1 0 13 38
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE WASHINGTON CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The season of 1894 was made noteworthy in the annals of the Washington
club, owing to their being able to pay off their six years' mortgage on
the last ditch, and transferred it to the Louisville club. The
"Senators" opened the season in a very lively style, inasmuch as they
stood a tie for first place at the end of the first day of the campaign,
and had the credit of winning their first games with the "Phillies," the
New York and Boston clubs. After this dash at the start they settled
down among the second division clubs for the season, resigned to
everything but the fate of again being tail-enders. Chicago kept them
out until May, when the "Senators" fell into their old quarters, the
tail-end place, where they remained until August 23d, when, to the great
joy of Manager Schmelz, they had a wrestle with Louisville and threw the
"Colonels" into the last ditch.

Here is their record:

THE WASHINGTON CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i P C L
B l C i S i o
a N a B l t t n u
l e d r e t C . c i
WASHINGTON t w B e o v s h i s
i o l o e b i L n v
vs. m Y s p k l u c o n i
o o t h l a r a u a l
r r o i y n g g i t l
e k n a n d h o s i e
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 1 2 3 4 3 13 4 4 5 6 5 8 32
Defeats 11 10 9 8 9 47 8 8 7 6 7 4 40
Games played 12 12 12 12 12 60 12 12 12 12 12 12 72
Per cent. of
Victories .083 .167 .250 .333 .250 .217 .333 .333 .417 .500 .147 .667 .444
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS
P
h
i P C L
B l C i S i o
a N a B l t t n u
l e d r e t C . c i
WASHINGTON t w B e o v s h i s
i o l o e b i L n v
vs. m Y s p k l u c o n i
o o t h l a r a u a l
r r o i y n g g i t l
e k n a n d h o s i e Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1
Series lost 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 0 1 0 4 9
Series tied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
Series unfinished 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
"Chicago" victories 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
"Chicago" defeats 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 3
Single figure victories 0 1 2 3 1 7 4 0 4 3 5 5 21 28
Single figure defeats 3 7 0 3 3 16 4 3 1 2 5 3 18 34
Double figure victories 1 1 1 1 2 6 0 4 1 3 0 3 11 17
Double figure defeats 8 3 9 5 6 31 4 5 6 4 2 1 22 53
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The "Senators" won but one series in the whole campaign, and that was
with the Louisvilles. They managed to tie with the St. Louis "Browns,"
but all the rest knocked them out--the Baltimores by 11 to 1.



THE LOUISVILLE CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Louisville club started in the race with better prospects than they
had for years past, they being tied for first place on April 20th, but
they only remained in the first division a few days, after which they
took up their home position among the tail-enders, which they occupied
from April 30th to September 30th, never once getting back to the ranks
of the first division. Gradually, during the May campaign they worked
their way down towards the last ditch, they having a close fight for the
ditch with Washington during June. But July saw them rolled into the
tail-end position, and there they remained until the ending of the
championship campaign. The Louisvilles had the consolation of tieing the
the St. Louis "Browns" in their series, and of "Chicagoing" the Boston
champions, and also in defeating them in another game by 11 to 1. Here
is their record:

THE LOUISVILLE CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS. WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C
B l a C i i
a N a B s l t S n
l e d r h e t C t c
LOUISVILLE t w B e o i v s h . i
i o l o n e b i L n
vs. m Y s p k g l u c o n
o o t h l t a r a u a
r r o i y o n g g i t
e k n a n n d h o s i
Totals Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories 2 0 2 3 4 4 15 3 3 4 6 5 21
Defeats 10 12 10 8 8 8 56 8 9 8 6 7 38
Games played 12 12 12 11 12 12 71 11 12 12 12 12 59
Per cent. of
Victories .167 .000 .167 .273 .333 .333 .211 .273 .250 .333 .500 .417 .356
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EASTERN CLUBS WESTERN CLUBS.
P
h
i W P C
B l a C i i
a N a B s l t S n
l e d r h e t C t c
LOUISVILLE t w B e o i v s h . i
i o l o n e b i L n
vs. m Y s p k g l u c o n
o o t h l t a r a u a
r r o i y o n g g i t
e k n a n n d h o s i Grand
Total Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Series lost 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 0 1 4 10
Series tied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1
Series unfinished 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2
"Chicago" victories 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2
"Chicago" defeats 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 3
Single figure victories 1 0 1 0 1 3 6 1 3 3 6 5 18 24
Single figure defeats 8 8 5 2 4 5 32 6 7 6 4 6 29 61
Double figure victories 1 0 1 3 3 1 9 2 0 1 0 0 3 12
Double figure defeats 2 5 5 6 4 3 25 2 2 2 2 1 9 34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The nearest the Louisvilles came to a series victory was in their series
with the St. Louis club, which they tied; all the others they lost, they
being "shut out" by the "Giants," with which club they lost thirteen
successive games, one of which was thrown out. The Club Management of
1894.

The management of the twelve League clubs in 1894 was, in but few
instances, in advance of that of 1893; and in a minority of cases it was
worse. The experience of the past season in the management of club
teams, points out the indisputable fact that the majority of managers
are blind to the folly of condoning drinking offences in the ranks, for
one thing, and equally ignorant of the damaging effects, in lessening
the reputable patronage of their grounds, of countenancing that phase of
"hoodlumism" in teams known as "kicking against the decisions of
umpires." Despite of the costly experience of the past five years in the
countenancing of drunkards in the League ranks, we see, this season of
1895, club teams including players notorious for their old drunken
habits. Why managers cannot perceive the folly of re-engaging such men
is a mystery. No matter what their skill at the bat or in the field may
be, their drinking habits, with the demoralizing effect on the teams at
large which follows, more than offset the advantage of their alleged
ability in the field. Despite this obvious fact, however, club
officials--either presidents, directors or managers--still blunder on in
having these drunkards on their teams, even after condoning their
offences time and again, on the promise of reform, which in no single
instance has ever taken place that I am aware of. But surpassing this
folly, is that of engaging ugly and vicious tempered players for their
teams, who are simply demoralizing agents in any team on which they are
engaged. These ill-tempered fellows are not only death to necessary
discipline, but they are sure to find occasions to form cliques in a
team, which war against the best interests of the club at large, and are
obnoxious in the extreme to the pennant winning rule of playing for the
side, a rule as important to the success of a club team in a pennant
race, as the reserve rule is to the life of the professional club
business at large. Bad management of clubs involves a variety of
blunders, not only in the running of the team without regard to business
principles--sadly neglected by a majority of the League clubs in
1894--but especially in the making up of teams in the spring months, in
which one blunder is conspicuous, viz., that of selecting players for
each team without regard to their ability to play in harmony together,
but solely by the records made in the unreliable table of averages of
the past season, in which everything in the way of scoring figures tends
to aid the mere record player and throws obstacles in the way of team
work players' records. Another managerial blunder is shown in the
gathering together of a long list of signed players, with the view of
selecting a strong team of a dozen players from the crowd for the
serious work of the campaign. For instance, in the makeup of many of the
League teams of 1894, the blunder of getting together six or eight
pitchers and occupying the whole of the early part of the season's
campaign in experiments with them was positive folly. It has never paid
in a single instance. It was, in fact, death to the success of at least
four League teams last season, Cincinnati in particular. Many of last
year's team managers failed to realize the important fact that in
testing the merits of pitchers in the spring season they need to be
given a fair trial, and not dismiss them after the hasty judgment of
their ability of a few games of trial. Pitchers need to be thoroughly
tested before they are released, after engagement, and this testing
process cannot at the shortest be done in less than a month's trial. No
pitcher can do his best while in doubt all the while as to the result of
a single day's play on his engagement. Five pitchers are amply
sufficient to begin a season with, and at most three catchers. But one
of the greatest and most costly blunders in team management made in 1894
was that of encouraging "hoodlumism" by the countenancing of blackguard
kicking, in defiance of the laws of the game, which presidents and
directors, as well as managers and captains, were alike guilty of to a
more or less extent. The rules of the game positively prohibit any
player of a nine on the field from disputing any decision of the umpire
except the captain, and he only in certain exceptional cases, and yet
not only did captains of teams allow this rule to be violated in every
game of the season, but they were openly countenanced in it by not only
their managers, but in many cases by club presidents and
directors. Under such circumstances is it any wonder that the season of
1894 stands on record as being marked by more disgraceful kicking, rowdy
play, blackguard language and brutal play than that of any season since
the League was organized? And all this was the result of a neglect of
business principles in club management, and in the blunders in managing
teams committed by incompetent managers and captains--an arraignment of
the National League which we hope never to have to record again.



THE MONTHLY CAMPAIGNS.


THE APRIL CAMPAIGN.

The short April campaign of 1894 began on April 19th, on which date
eight of the twelve clubs opened the season; New York losing at
Baltimore, Brooklyn at Boston, Philadelphia at Washington, and
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, rain preventing the games scheduled for
Louisville and Cincinnati. On the 20th Chicago opened at Cincinnati with
a defeat, as did Cleveland at Louisville. By the end of the month's
campaign, on April 30th, the games played left the Boston, Cleveland and
St. Louis clubs tied for first place in the month's record, with
Philadelphia fourth, Baltimore fifth, and Pittsburgh sixth the second
division clubs being headed by Cincinnati--tied with Pittsburgh for
sixth place--and followed by Louisville, New York and Brooklyn tied for
ninth position, Washington and Chicago, the latter club being a bad
tail-ender with a record of eight defeats out of nine games played.

Here is the complete record of the thirteen days' campaign of the
opening month of the season, fifty victories and as many defeats having
been recorded:

THE APRIL RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
--------------------------------------------------
Boston 6 2 8 .750 Cincinnati 4 4 8 .500
Cleveland 6 2 8 .750 Louisville 4 5 9 .444
St. Louis 6 2 8 .750 New York 3 5 8 .375
Philadelphia 6 3 9 .667 Brooklyn 3 5 8 .375
Baltimore 5 3 8 .625 Washington 2 7 9 .174
Pittsburgh 4 4 8 .500 Chicago 1 8 9 .111
--------------------------------------------------

It had been confidently expected that Boston would be in the lead and
Cleveland not far off; but that St. Louis should be tied with both for
the lead was a surprise. Philadelphia was in its anticipated place, but
Baltimore was lower than the club officials had looked for, as also New
York, while the fact that the tail-ender of 1893 led the Chicago "Colts"
of 1894 was a disagreeable ending of the month's play for the Chicago
cranks.



THE MAY CAMPAIGN.

The May campaign changed the relative positions of the twelve clubs
materially. By May 31st, Pittsburgh had pulled up to the leading
position, having won 18 out of 23 games; and while Cleveland had held
its position fairly well, Baltimore had done better than Boston, and New
York had won more games than Brooklyn. Chicago, too, had rallied, while
St. Louis had fallen off badly, as also Cincinnati and Louisville; the
Washingtons winning but 4 games out of 23, that club ending the second
month's campaign a bad tail-ender in the figures of May. Here is the
record for May:

THE MAY RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
--------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh 18 5 28 .783 Brooklyn 12 11 23 .522
Cleveland 13 7 20 .684 Chicago 9 12 21 .429
Baltimore 12 6 18 .667 St. Louis 9 16 25 .360
Boston 14 8 22 .636 Cincinnati 7 13 20 .350
Philadelphia 12 7 19 .632 Louisville 6 14 20 .300
New York 13 11 24 .542 Washington 4 19 23 .174
--------------------------------------------------------

The monthly record differs in its percentage figures from the pennant
race record, as the latter gives the totals of the games played from
April 19th, while the former gives the totals of each month's games
only. A hundred and twenty-nine games, resulting in victories, were
played in May, with, of course, the same number of defeats. Seven of the
twelve clubs won more games than they lost.



THE JUNE CAMPAIGN.

The June campaign opened with Cleveland in the van in pennant race
percentages, the other clubs in the first division being the Pittsburgh,
Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston and Brooklyn clubs in order; New York
leading the second division, followed by St. Louis, Cincinnati,
Louisville, Chicago and Washington; the leader in the race having a
percentage of .690, and the tail-ender .212, a difference in percentage
figures of 478 points, showing a poorly contested race thus far. Only
two Western clubs by this time remained in the first division, viz.,
Cleveland and Pittsburgh; New York and Washington being the two Eastern
clubs in the second division. Baltimore overtook and passed Cleveland in
the first week of the June campaign, and closed the month in the
lead. Boston, too, rallied and pulled up in the race from fifth place on
June 4th to second position by June 11th, and remained there to the end
of the month. Brooklyn also took a jump from sixth place on June 18th to
third position on June 29th; New York not getting out of the second
division until the last of the month. In the meantime the two Western
teams of Cleveland and Pittsburgh began to lose ground, and by the 21st
of June they occupied fifth and sixth positions in the race, Cleveland
leading their rivals of Pittsburgh by 13 points. On the same date
Philadelphia was in third place, but the "Phillies" fell off to fifth
position by the end of the month. In victories won during June Brooklyn
led with 18 games won out of 23 played, Baltimore being second with 20
victories and 6 defeats, and Boston third with 18 games won to 8
lost. On June 8th Washington had pushed Louisville into the last ditch,
and also led Chicago; but the "Colts" got ahead of the "Senators" by the
end of the month. On June 30th Baltimore held the lead in the pennant
race with the percentage figures of .712 to Louisville's .255, a
difference of 457 points, only one Western club being in the first
division at the end of the month.

Here is the record of the June campaign, showing which club led in won
games during the month.

THE JUNE RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
--------------------------------------------------------
Brooklyn 18 5 28 .789 Philadelphia 11 12 23 .478
Baltimore 20 6 26 .769 Cleveland 9 13 22 .409
Boston 18 8 26 .692 St. Louis 10 15 25 .406
New York 15 8 23 .686 Washington 9 15 24 .375
Pittsburgh 13 13 26 .500 Chicago 8 17 25 .320
Cincinnati 12 13 25 .480 Louisville 4 22 26 .154
--------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that out of the twelve clubs but four won more games
than they lost, the Louisvilles ending the month's play with a record of
but 4 games won out of 26 played, the poorest record of any single month
of the season.



THE JULY CAMPAIGN.

The July campaign opened with the Baltimore and Boston clubs as apparent
fixtures for the two leading positions, the "Orioles" leading the
champions on July 5th by seven points only, viz., .679 to .672. On the 2d
of July New York was sixth and Brooklyn third in the race. By July 5th,
however, the "Giants" had jumped into third place, and Brooklyn had
fallen back to sixth position. On the same date Baltimore, Boston and
New York occupied the three leading positions, and though three more
months of the season still remained, the other nine clubs were even then
virtually out of the race, the only other point of interest left in the
championship contest being that of the fight for the last three places
in the first division, Pittsburgh being at that time the only Western
club out of the second division. Of course, such a one-sided condition
of things in the pennant race led to a falling off in the interest in
the championship contests, especially out West, where the clubs of that
section lost patronage greatly, four of the six Western clubs being
virtually out of the race as early as May, as far as winning the pennant
was concerned. During July there were only two points of interest in the
race outside of the fight for first place between the three leaders,
viz., the struggle between the Brooklyn and Philadelphia clubs for
fourth place in the race, and that between the Cleveland and Pittsburgh
clubs to retain a place in the first division. Cleveland lost its
position in the first division the first week in July, Pittsburgh on
July 2d being in fourth place. By the 6th of that month the "Phillies"
had overtaken them, and by the 9th the Pittsburghs were down to sixth
place, the Clevelands then heading the second division. The "Pirates"
then rallied and got ahead of Brooklyn, the latter being driven into the
second division by July 17th, Cleveland rallying and getting among the
six leaders again by the 18th of July, after which date they remained in
that division to the close of the season, A feature of the July campaign
among the six tail-end clubs was the close fight between Washington and
Louisville on the edge of the last ditch. First one club would cross
the goal line and make a touch-down--as the foot ball men have it--and
then the other, Louisville being in eleventh place at the end of the
month, while the "Senators" rolled about in the last ditch. When the
July campaign ended Boston was in the van with the percentage figures of
.659, Baltimore being second with .618, and New York third with .613. It
looked at that time pretty sure for Boston.

Here is the record of the month's play, showing which club won the most
games during July:

THE JULY RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
--------------------------------------------------------
New York 18 7 25 .720 Philadelphia 12 14 26 .462
Boston 16 9 25 .640 Baltimore 10 14 24 .417
Cleveland 18 11 29 .621 Pittsburgh 10 16 26 .385
Chicago 16 10 26 .615 St. Louis 10 17 27 .370
Cincinnati 16 11 27 .593 Brooklyn 9 16 25 .360
Louisville 13 15 28 .464 Washington 8 16 24 .331
--------------------------------------------------------

But five clubs out of the twelve won more games than they lost during
the July campaign, but there was a little improvement shown in the
difference of percentage points between the leader and tail-ender, the
figures being .363. The Baltimores made the poorest record in July for a
month's campaign of any they made during the season; while New York made
the best show of any one of their four months' campaigns up to the close
of July. Chicago also made their best monthly record in July, likewise
Cincinnati and Louisville.



THE AUGUST CAMPAIGN.

Baltimore rallied in fine style in August, that club winning 22 out of
29 games that month, while New York won 20 out of 28; but Boston won
only 15 out of 25, Philadelphia pulling up with 19 out of 29. Chicago
also won a majority of their August games, these being the only clubs of
the twelve which won more games during the month than they lost. When
the August campaign opened the first division clubs included Boston,
Baltimore, New York, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn, the "Phillies"
being in the second division; but the latter soon took Brooklyn's place
and sent them to seventh place in the race. But before the first week
of the month had ended, Brooklyn replaced Pittsburgh in the first
division. The "Pirates," however rallied and drove their Eastern
opponents back again; Brooklyn ending the month in sixth place, and
after that the "Pirates" remained at the head of the second division to
the finish. The 31st of August saw the first division clubs fixed for
the season, as far as first and sixth places in the race were concerned,
the interesting point in the month's campaign being the struggle between
the New York and Boston clubs for second place and that between Brooklyn
and Philadelphia for fourth position. There was but one Western club in
the first division at the end of August, the other five staying in the
second division to the finish, a result that was ruinous to the
financial interests of the Western clubs, and to a large extent to the
clubs of the East, all of which clubs played to "small houses" out West,
especially at Louisville, the cranks of "Breckinridgeville" being
disgusted with their local club team during the last three months of the
season.

Here is the record of the August campaign, showing each club's victories
and defeats for August;

THE AUGUST RECORD.
-----------------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
-----------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore 22 7 29 .759 Washington 13 14 27 .481
New York 20 8 28 .714 St. Louis 9 13 22 .409
Philadelphia 19 10 29 .655 Cleveland 9 15 24 .375
Boston 15 10 25 .600 Pittsburgh 8 16 24 .333
Chicago 15 12 27 .556 Cincinnati 7 19 26 .269
Brooklyn 14 14 28 .500 Louisville 5 18 23 .217
-----------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that August was a bad month for the Boston champions,
while it was the very reverse for the Chicago "Colts," the latter making
their best monthly record in August. The difference in percentage
points between the leader and the tail-ender at the close of the August
campaign was 355 points, the best of the season to that date. Still the
figures showed a comparatively poor race, several of the minor league
races being more evenly contested. Cleveland and Pittsburgh were behind
Washington in percentage of victories during the August campaign, the
latter making their best monthly record in August, thereby escaping
their old place in the last ditch.



THE SEPTEMBER CAMPAIGN.

Baltimore virtually had the pennant in their hands the first week of the
September campaign, the only point of interest in the race left at that
time being the struggle for second place between New York and Boston;
all of the other clubs had long been practically out of the race, a
result which involved considerable loss for the majority of the twelve
League clubs. This state of things in the major league pennant race is
the result of the selfish policy of a minority in trying to monopolize
the cream of the playing element in the League ranks without regard to
the saving clause of the League organization, the principle of "One for
all and all for one," the very essence of the plan of running the
League on true business principles.

During September the Brooklyn club tried their best to oust the
"Phillies" out of fourth place, while the Clevelands worked hard to take
Brooklyn's position in fifth place, but both clubs failed in their
projects. Up to September 6th the "Giants" tried in vain to send the
Bostons down to third place, but it was not until the 7th of September
that they were able to oust the champions out of second place in the
race, and when they did so they kept them out to the finish, the
champions failing to rally after they had lost the position. It was a
close fight, however, as on September 10th New York led Boston in
percentage of victories by only 3 points, viz., .655 to .652, Baltimore
leading at that date with .684. By September 19th, however, the Bostons
had got down to .631, and New York's figures were .667, with "the
country safe." Boston's lowest score in percentage figures for the month
was reached on September 25th, when they touched .623. By that time the
places in the first division were all settled, and all of those in the
second division also, except Cincinnati and St. Louis. On September 29th
Cincinnati led St. Louis by the percentage figures of .424 to .415, but
two victories by St. Louis over Washington, against a drawn game by
Cincinnati with Cleveland on the 30th, gave St. Louis the lead by .424
to .419, and Comiskey's "Reds" had to finish in tenth position, beaten
in the race by Von der Abe's "Browns," a galling fact for the Cincinnati
cranks.

Here is the month's record of victories and defeats in September:

THE SEPTEMBER RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
P P
P e P e
l r l r
L a c L a c
W o y e W o y e
o s e n o s e n
Clubs. n t d t Clubs. n t d t
--------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore 20 3 23 .870 Philadelphia 13 12 25 .520
New York 20 6 26 .769 St. Louis 11 13 24 .458
Boston 14 11 25 .560 Cincinnati 10 16 26 .385
Cleveland 13 11 24 .542 Chicago 9 17 26 .346
Brooklyn 14 12 26 .538 Washington 8 16 24 .333
Pittsburgh 12 11 23 .522 Louisville 5 21 26 .192
--------------------------------------------------------

The appended summary shows the progress of each club from the opening to
the close of the season, as also in what month each club made its best
and worst record during the championship campaign:




SUMMARY OF VICTORIES AND DEFEATS.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
T
S h
e e
p
A t F
A u e i
p J J g m n
r M u u u b i
i a n l s e s
l y e y t r h
Clubs. W. L. W. L. W. L. W. L. W. L. W. L. W. L.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore 5 3 12 6 20 6 10 14 22 7 20 3 89 39
New York 3 5 13 11 15 8 18 7 20 8 20 6 88 44
Boston 6 2 14 8 18 8 16 9 15 10 14 11 83 49
Philadelphia 6 3 12 7 11 12 12 14 19 10 13 12 71 56
Brooklyn 3 5 12 11 18 5 9 16 14 14 14 12 70 61
Cleveland 6 2 13 7 9 13 18 11 9 15 13 11 68 61
Pittsburgh 4 4 18 5 13 13 10 16 8 16 12 11 65 65
Chicago 1 8 9 12 8 17 16 10 15 12 9 17 57 75
St. Louis 6 2 9 16 10 15 10 17 9 13 11 13 56 76
Cincinnati 4 4 7 13 12 13 16 11 7 19 10 16 54 75
Washington 2 7 4 19 9 15 8 16 13 14 8 16 45 87
Louisville 4 5 6 14 4 22 13 15 5 18 5 21 36 94
Totals 50 50 129 129 147 147 156 156 156 156 149 149 782 782
----------------------------------------------------------------------



MONTHLY RECORD OF PERCENTAGE.

The following table shows the monthly record of percentage of victories
in the campaign from April to September.

----------------------------------------------
1894. S
e
p
A t
A u e
p J J g m
r M u u u b
i a n l s e
Clubs. l y e y t r
---------------------------------------------
Baltimore .625 .654 .712 .618 .657 .695
New York .375 .500 .564 .613 .639 .667
Boston .750 .645 .667 .659 .645 .629
Philadelphia .667 .643 .569 .526 .562 .559
Brooklyn .375 .500 .623 .545 .533 .534
Cleveland .750 .679 .549 .575 .529 .527
Pittsburgh .500 .710 .614 .531 .491 .500
Chicago .111 .333 .327 .430 .458 .432
St. Louis .750 .455 .431 .412 .411 .421
Cincinnati .500 .393 .434 .488 .434 .419
Washington .222 .188 .281 .296 .343 .341
Louisville .444 .345 .255 .325 .302 .277
---------------------------------------------

It will be seen that in percentage figures of each month's play, Boston,
Cleveland and St. Louis were tied in April. In May, Pittsburgh,
Cleveland and Baltimore led. In June, Baltimore, Boston and Brooklyn
were in the van. In July, the three leaders were Boston, Baltimore and
New York. In August, also, the same three were nearest the goal, and
September saw Baltimore carrying off the pennant, followed by New York
and Boston.



THE CAMPAIGN RECORD OF 1894.

We introduce in the GUIDE for 1895 a new and important record, which
shows, at a glance almost, the total score of each championship game
won, lost and drawn from April 19th to September 30th, inclusive,
and also gives the names of the pitchers who were credited with pitching
in a victory, or charged with pitching in a defeat. The record of each
month's campaign, too, is given, with the position in the pennant race
each of the twelve clubs occupied at the close of each month's campaign
of the six comprising the championship season. This record in full will
be found to be the most complete table of the statistics of the League
season yet published in the GUIDE series, and especially valuable as a
reference record.



THE APRIL RECORD.

The League championship season of 1894 began on April 19th and ended on
September 30th, the April campaign opening at Boston, Baltimore,
Washington and St. Louis on the 19th, at Cincinnati and Louisville on
the 20th, and at Philadelphia and Brooklyn on the 21st, while the
opening games at New York, Pittsburgh and Chicago were not played until
the 24th, 25th and 28th of April respectively, and not at Cleveland
until May 3d. Fifty games were played in April, the twelve clubs of the
two divisions of the League being engaged in playing their respective
home-and-home series. Here is the complete record of the April campaign,
showing the pitchers of each side and the total score of each contest of
the month:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date Contesting Clubs. City. Pitchers. Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
April
19 Boston vs. Brooklyn Boston Stivetts Kennedy 13-2
19 Baltimore vs. New York Baltimore McMahon Rusie 8-3
19 Washington vs. Philadelphi Washington Esper Weyhing 4-2
19 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh St. Louis Breitenstein Killen 11-3
20 Baltimore vs. New York Baltimore Mullane Clark 12-6
20 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Washington Taylor Stephens 9-8
20 Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cincinnati Parrott Hutchinson 10-6
20 Louisville vs. Cleveland Louisville Menafee Young 10-3
21 Boston vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn Nichols Stein 3-0
21 Baltimore vs. New York Baltimore Inks Westervelt 4-3
21 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Philadelphia Carsey Esper 10-2
21 Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cincinnati Chamberlain Abbey 8-0
21 Cleveland vs. Louisville Louisville Cuppy Hemming 5-1
21 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis St. Louis Gumbert Gleason 7-2
22 Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cincinnati Dwyer McGill 5-4
22 Cleveland vs. Louisville Louisville Clarkson Kilroy 3-2
23 Boston vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn Lovett Daub 7-4
23 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Washington Weyhing Stockdale 8-4
23 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh St. Louis Breitenstein Ehret 4-3
24 Baltimore vs. Boston Baltimore McMahon Stivetts 15-3
24 Washington vs. New York Washington Petty Rusie 6-3
24 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn Carsey Korwan 22-5
24 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati Young Parrott 1-0
24 Louisville vs. Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Menafee Nicol 7-3
24 St. Louis vs. Chicago Chicago A. Clarkson McGill 9-5
25 New York vs. Washington Washington German Maul 14-5
25 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia Brooklyn Stein Taylor 8-2
25 Boston vs. Baltimore Baltimore Nichols Mullane 6-3
25 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati Cuppy Chamberlain 12-6
25 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville Louisville Gumbert Hemming 2-1
25 St. Louis vs. Chicago Chicago Hawley Hutchinson 13-3
26 New York vs. Washington Washington Meekin Stockdale 7-5
26 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn Brooklyn Weyhing Sharrott 13-3
26 Boston vs. Baltimore Baltimore Staley Brown 13-7
26 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati Clarkson Cross 12-4
26 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville Louisville Killen Kilroy 3-1
26 St. Louis vs. Chicago Chicago Gleason Abbey 10-4
27 No games scheduled ----------- ----
28 New York vs. Baltimore New York Rusie McMahon 9-6
28 Brooklyn vs. Washington Washington Stein Petty 10-9
28 Philadelphia vs. Boston Philadelphia Carsey Stivetts 14-3
28 St. Louis vs. Cleveland St. Louis Breitenstein Young 7-1
28 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh Cincinnati Parrott Terry 10-5
28 Chicago vs. Louisville Louisville McGill Menafee 2-1
29 Cleveland vs. St Louis St. Louis Cuppy A. Clarkson 5-2
29 Louisville vs. Chicago Louisville Hemming McGill 8-3
30 Baltimore vs. New York New York Mullane German 10-6
30 Brooklyn vs. Washington Washington Gastright Mercer 15-10
30 Boston vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia Nichols Weyhing[1] 6-5
30 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati Nicol Chamberlain 15-6
30 Louisville vs. Chicago Louisville Stratton McGill 8-2

[Footnote 1: Ten innings.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The record showing the total victories and defeats scored by each of the
twelve clubs during the April campaign is as follows. The names are
given in the order of the percentage of victories scored in the pennant
race:

APRIL PENNANT RACE RECORD.
-------------------------------------------------------
V V
i P i P
c D e c D e
t e P r t e P r
o f l o f l
r e a c r e a c
i a y e i a y e
e t e n e t e n
CLUBS s s d t CLUBS s s d t
------------------------------------------------------
Boston 6 2 8 .750 Cincinnati 4 4 8 .500
Cleveland 6 2 8 .750 Louisville 4 5 9 .444
St. Louis 6 2 8 .750 New York 3 5 8 .375
Philadelphia 6 3 9 .667 Brooklyn 3 5 8 .375
Baltimore 5 3 8 .625 Washington 2 7 9 .222
Pittsburgh 4 4 8 .500 Chicago 1 8 9 .111

Fifty games were played from April 19th to April 30th, inclusive.
None were drawn or forfeited.
------------------------------------------------------

The first month of the championship campaign, short as it was, was
marked by the largest attendance for the month of April known in the
history of the League, an aggregate of 188,509 people patronizing the
twenty-five games played in the East and 82,719 for the twenty-five
played in the West. The largest aggregate attendance on a single day was
45,332 on April 21st, on which date 40,324 people patronized the three
games played at Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Baltimore, and 5,008 the
three games played at Cincinnati, St. Louis and Louisville. Though three
Western clubs occupied positions in the first division--Cleveland and
St. Louis tieing Boston for first place--the attendance in the West, as
will be seen above, did not compare with that at the three games in the
East, the terribly hard times out West greatly affecting everything in
the amusement line in the Western League club cities.

Boston, Cleveland and St. Louis started off well in the pennant race in
April, these three clubs ending the April campaign tied for first place;
with the "Phillies" a good fourth, Baltimore fifth, and Pittsburgh and
Cincinnati tied for sixth position, Louisville being eighth, with New
York and B





Next: The Base Running Of 1894

Previous: The Campaigns Of The Other Nine Clubs Of 1894



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