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A Compliment To The Editor Of The Guide






At the annual meeting of the National League, held at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel, New York, on Nov. 15, 1894, on a motion made by C.H. Byrne,
president of the Brooklyn club, Henry Chadwick, the veteran base ball
writer, and editor of the League GUIDE since 1881, was, by a unanimous
vote, made an honorary member of that body. This honor has been
conferred upon but four other persons in the history of the League,
namely: A.G. Mills, of New York, ex-President of the League;
A.G. Spalding, of Chicago; George W. Howe, of Cleveland, and John
B. Day, of New York. In presenting Mr. Chadwick's name Mr. Byrne spoke
enthusiastically of the effective work the veteran had done for years in
popularizing base ball, and called attention to the fact that
Mr. Chadwick was the recognized authority in all matters pertaining to
base ball, and to him more than any other individual living is due the
credit for the present almost perfect code of rules governing the game.

The League subsequently appointed a committee, consisting of President
N.E. Young, C.H. Byrne, of Brooklyn, and A.J. Reach, of Philadelphia, to
prepare a proper address to Mr. Chadwick, and to have same engrossed and
framed for presentation. The result of their official duty was an
exceptionally handsome piece of engrossing, set in a gilt frame. A
pastel portrait of Mr. Chadwick is in the centre of a decorative scroll
on which is the following testimonial:



The
NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
of
PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS OF THE UNITED STATES
to
HENRY CHADWICK.

At a regular annual meeting of the National League and American
Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, held in New York City,
November 15, 1894, all twelve clubs being present,

MR. HENRY CHADWICK,
of Brooklyn, N. Y.,
was by a unanimous vote elected an
HONORARY MEMBER
of this body.

In conferring this membership this organization pays the highest tribute
in its power to one who, during a number of years almost as great as is
usually alloted to man to live, has unselfishly devoted his time, his
talents and his energies, by voice and pen, to establish BASE BALL as
the NATIONAL GAME of America.

At all times and in all places he has diligently worked for its
DEVELOPMENT, and battled for its INTEGRITY, its HONESTY and the PURITY
of its methods.

He has been an unflinching foe of those within the ranks who permitted
any stigma to attach to it and a gallant defender against any attack
from without, touching its good name and fame. Always a devoted friend
of the honest ball player, he has been a never-failing advocate of the
rights of and the respect due the umpire. His advice and good offices
most frequently sought have ever been readily given, and to the benefit
and advantage of all.

We pay this tribute with pleasure and deference to

HENRY CHADWICK,

the father of base ball, who now in the full of his years and after a
long life of usefulness to his fellow man, still lives to see the
fruition of his fondest hopes, and base ball, which he has fostered and
upheld, pleaded for and battled for, now established forevermore as our
national game.

The National League and American Association of Professional Base Ball
Clubs, Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington,
Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago.

N.E. YOUNG,
C.H. BYRNE,
A.J. REACH,
*Committee.

NEW YORK, November 15, 1894.






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